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Go behind the scenes and follow the people and projects that go into creating a Marietta’s Theatre in the Square production.

A LIGHT IN THE DARKNESS

Just before the COVID-19 epidemic hit home, MNTS founders honored by the Georgia House of Representatives

On Saturday March 7th, Marietta’s New Theatre in the Square was in celebration! They were honored by the Georgia House of Representatives with a formal proclamation recognizing their outstanding achievements. Owner, operator, and producer, Raul Thomas, attended the ceremony accompanied by Artistic Director, Emil Thomas, and his wife and company supporter, Yvette Thomas. This honor was bestowed in person by Representative Pedro Marin of District 96, on behalf of the House of Representatives. 

The theater was chosen to receive this honor due to their efforts to restore the historical Theatre in the Square, their personal connection to their patrons, their exceptional, award-winning productions, their inclusive artistic vision, and their commitment to give back to the community. Raul Thomas was additionally honored at this ceremony, as he was named an Outstanding Georgia Citizen by the Secretary of State. He was granted this honor for his outstanding charitable efforts in Puerto Rico disaster relief, and for his commitment to the Marietta community. 

These honors would not have been possible to achieve without the support of the Marietta community and, specifically, the loyal patrons of Marietta’s New Theatre in the Square.  Since receiving this honor, the MNTS team had to make a difficult decision to honor that community by temporarily shutting down and postponing shows in the current climate of COVID-19. MNTS is not supported by grants or corporate donations; we are a mom and pop operation and rely on ticket sales. Without our shows and our beloved audiences, we will be facing a significant financial loss. If you have anything to give in this difficult time, we ask you to purchase a ticket to a future show here or make a donation by clicking here. We are so grateful for all of your support. 

We will be monitoring closely our reopen date, but we plan to open again April 3rd and 4th featuring The Better Halves comedy show. PIPELINE is currently scheduled to reopen on April 10th. If you have any questions or need to reschedule a ticket, please call us at 770-428-2800, or email us at boxofficetheatresquare@gmail.com.

Be safe! Care for yourself and your families.

UNAPOLOGETIC

An interview with Artistic Director, N. Emil Thomas, on this production of PIPELINE

N. EMIL THOMAS is the 26-year-old theatre maker behind Marietta’s New Theatre in the Square. His productions with MTS have collectively earned six Broadway World Atlanta Awards and four Metropolitan Atlanta Theatre Awards. Emil was selected as an emerging director by Victory Gardens Theater in Chicago, and he was given the prestigious opportunity to serve as Assistant Director for one of their mainstage productions. Emil is currently earning his MFA in Directing from DePaul University in Chicago. We caught up with this southern gentleman with a New York attitude to hear his thoughts about MNTS’ current production, PIPELINE.


INTERVIEWER: As Artistic Director, you are responsible for spearheading the selection of shows for MNTS’ seasons. What made you choose PIPELINE? How does this play align with your larger vision for the season and the theater’s mission as a whole?

NET: I had been wanting to do a piece by Dominique Morisseau for some time now. When I started to really dive into Black female playwrights, she was one of the first artists that I discovered. I truly fell in love with the way she uses language, the way she puts women in the forefront of storytelling, and the way she, as I like to describe it, brings August Wilson’s work into the 21st century. I believe that she, in our lineage of Black American theatre, is the next evolution of our work. I had the privilege of working on Morisseau’s work as an Assistant Director at Victory Gardens Theater in Chicago in early 2018, and after hosting all of the talkbacks and really hearing the perspectives of the students, teachers, parents, and community trying to figure out how we come to a solution for the this school-to-prison pipeline system, it was apparent that this was a conversation that belonged on the Emil Stage. It needed to take place in Georgia because this is something happening in our communities today. 

We at MNTS are very interested in building up the work that we do that involves students, teachers, and education, so this piece really checks off all the boxes for us. I specifically wanted a female director this season and to give her a piece that had female characters at the forefront. Morisseau wrote a perfect piece for all that, and it seemed fitting to have it as the opener for this year. 

INTERVIEWER: Speaking of directors, what made you select Mia Kristin Smith to direct this work? What made this piece and this director a natural pair? 

NET: So in 2017, we did August Wilson’s Gem of the Ocean, and that was directed by Amina S. McIntyre, who had previously worked with Nic Starr in some of his earlier productions. Amina did a great job, and I was very interested in bringing her back to make her a Resident Director of the theatre. She is, however, currently in grad school, so she’s unavailable to direct during the school year. However, she had a Co-director working with her at their theatre company, and so Amina recommended Mia Kristin Smith to me. Mia is a graduate of multiple universities. She has studied the art of theatre, the art of acting. She has spent the majority of her adult life acting and directing. One of the reasons she moved to Georgia was to pursue directing. Mia had experience directing Dominique Morisseau’s work before, and she had insight into it that would produce a story that I was interested in seeing. I chose Mia because I believed that she would be able to go the distance and put a twist on the show, as we often do in the Emil Theatre. Most importantly she would be herself and bring a twang to the house that we don’t currently have. 

INTERVIEWER: You got to see PIPELINE this past weekend at MNTS; what excited you most about it? 

NET: I’m very excited about the relationships that take place in PIPELINE, specifically the relationships between Omari and his father, and Jasmine and Nya. I’m all for seeing young, teenage, 21st century humans truly speak their mind. I want to see them understand what they’re saying, and be given the position to say what they feel, what they think, what they want, and be able to vocalize what they won’t accept from other people. This year I turned 26, and in turning 26 I naturally reminisced about the past decade of my life, and how at 16 there were teachers that allowed me to speak my mind, and many who did not allow me to speak my mind. There were some that respected me, and others that tried to hush me and make me wait until I was an adult to express myself. Those relationships interested me. With Jasmine and her first love, we often dismiss people and their first relationships, but there is a lot to share and a lot to lose with your first love. Watching Jasmine fight for that love is funny and true and relevant and tragic . It’s what she’s feeling in the moment, and you can’t take that from anyone. I don’t want to see apologetic people anymore. I want to see us out, I want to see us bold, I want to see us free, I want to see us express ourselves. And that’s what I love about this show: everyone is bold, everyone is free, everyone is expressing themselves unapologetically. 

INTERVIEWER: What do audiences have to look forward to in seeing PIPELINE? What to you is special about this production? 

NET: This production is special because of the importance of space and time. Mia specifically wanted to make sure that each location that the script calls for is built out. So often you see PIPELINE and it is a minimal set that can function as different locations, and for Mia it was very important that you understood how pressurized the world is and where the pressure exists in each scene. She wanted you to see where characters release and where they are trapped. What’s special about this production is that you can see that pressure; the room really shapes what they can do. Sometimes it helps them, and sometimes it really doesn’t help them. There is an element of surrealism which is great, and a beautiful musical score. It’s strong, it’s powerful, it rumbles the room. There isn’t an intermission so you’re in it the whole way. 


PIPELINE runs from March 6th through March 29th. Get your tickets by clicking here or by calling our box office at 770-426-2800. Group and educational rates available via phone.


“YOU AREN’T GONNA WALK OUT THE SAME WAY YOU WALKED IN” 

Jason C. Louder on PIPELINE, life as an educator, and disruption 

 

JASON C. LOUDER served as an educator for years before beginning life as a working actor. Gracing our screens as 2BITS in CW’s Black Lightning, Cressy in Hulu’s Wu-Tang: An American Saga, and other roles, we are honored to have Louder join our stage at Marietta’s New Theatre in the Square. We caught up with him in rehearsals for PIPELINE to learn about his perspective on the production as both an actor and an educator.


INTERVIEWER: PIPELINE features several seminal literary works by Black authors (Gwendolyn Brooks’ “We Real Cool,” Richard Wright’s “Native Son,” and Ralph Ellison’s “Invisible Man”). Do you have a core work of Black art, literary or otherwise, that consistently inspires you? 

 

JASON C LOUDER: Wow, I’ll just go back to what relates to me personally. I read Native Son in high school, and that was actually the first book that I read all the way through; all the other books, man, that they assigned to me just didn’t resonate; I couldn’t relate to it- I just read Cliff’s Notes. But that book man, Native Son, I fully read it and it changed me because it showed me the depth of the psyche of being Black and what we have to deal with. Bigger Thomas, he was confused to say the least. So Native Son, that was one of the first works, and then of course The Autobiography of Malcolm X was another book that changed my life. I can say those were two core pieces of literature that I read early on, at the age of 17. They changed my life, and I started taking on reading more, digesting more. Of course, Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun–I could just go on with the depth of literature I started to go into. Anybody really in that Renaissance era, man, just dope. They were just so dope, and they showed us what it meant to be Black. 

 

INTERVIEWER: This play explores the power of two parallel pipelines- the school to prison pipeline and the pipeline of those who are decided to be “gifted and talented.” Throughout, we witness the power of educators, particularly those who empower their students to be who they really are, uninhibited by stereotypes or respectability politics. Is there a teacher or mentor who has empowered you in this way? How have they inspired your experience with PIPELINE? 

 

JCL: I’m a former educator; I taught school for 17 years- Kindergarten through 8th grade at a private school. I’m a teacher, so that’s my area, and I can truly say when I think about education, my first teacher was my mother. She instilled all the values and the mores in me that I needed to have to navigate in the world. My third grade teacher, Ms. Schuster, man, she really impacted my life heavily. I was at a private school, Old National Christian Academy, and she just showed us so much love. It didn’t matter–Black, white, Asian–it didn’t matter our race, ethnicity, or background, she was the teacher that said, “Hey, I love you for who you are.” She taught us from that space, and we learned so much. Then, of course, when I transitioned into education myself, my first principal, Ms. Sandra Quash, she gave me the opportunity to see what it means to impact and to have an effect on the lives of children. From there, Ms. Rosenberg and Ms. Jackson, they shifted my whole paradigm into overstanding how We are responsible for Us. When I say Us I’m talking about how African-American teachers are responsible for the livelihood of African-American children. With that being said, I was able to really formulate a concept of what it means to be Black, and then to be able to share that, to educate our students on what that meant and the importance of that. Giving them that foundation, man, it allowed them to truly excel and to truly become the beautiful and powerful beings that they are now. Some of them are doctors and lawyers now, some of them are advocates in the Senate- knowing that I was a part of planting those seeds is like none other. Understanding the importance of education and being intentional about what we tell our children and how we teach our children- that shifted my whole mindset. I’m a part of higher learning, and that’s a blessing.  

 

INTERVIEWER: PIPELINE is an emotionally complex play, exploring simultaneously dynamics

of race, class, and family. What drew you to this project? 

 

JCS: I first saw PIPELINE at the Horizon Theatre, and it blew me away, knowing that this piece of work was alive, and the actors in it brought Dominique Morisseau’s words to life. I said, “Man, if I get a chance to, I’m going to be in this piece. I want to do this piece.” The chance presented itself, and I reached out to Raul Thomas and Mia Kristin Smith, and I came in to audition, and they gave me the opportunity to be a part of Dominique’s work. It’s been transformative; the rehearsal process is powerful, and knowing that [Morisseau] is intentional about her work and about breaking the system. Essentially, we have to disrupt the system, and I think that’s what this piece does. It also transcends class, race, and gender. It shows us we have people in the field that are Black, white, whomever, teaching our children and knowing that they are all a part of this bigger system. It’s almost a war that’s going on for the lives of our children. We have to fight, we have to combat that, and how we do it is essential in winning the war. 

 

INTERVIEWER: You all are early in the creation process. What has brought you the most joy

working with this ensemble so far? What are you excited about? 

 

JCL: Hey man, this is an amazing cast. We’ve got some amazing castmates, so just in every rehearsal we love on each other. It’s a family; we a little family here. We look out for each other. Mia be giving us snacks (thank you Mia!), but at the end of the day we know we’re doing a greater work. We are responsible for the words of Dominique Morisseau. The process has been very intentional. Mia has been very specific about the things she sees, and she’s open to us collaborating with her in the process. It’s really a collaboration between all of us, and we’re pulling out something greater than us.  

 

INTERVIEWER: Dominque Morriseau displays an amazing use of language in this play, as each character speaks in their own unique musicality and cadence. It’s as if each person has their own poetry. How does the dialogue of this play affect your understanding of the story?

 

JCL: The dialogue is very poetic. It’s very rich in the language that we speak today, so she’s very in tune with how we speak and how we communicate with one another. For me, it just informs my character, Dun, in what’s important to him and what he sees and how he sees, how he navigates inside of the school system. It really allows me to delve deeper into the inner workings of my character, and then how I see my peers or scene partners. It gives us a greater understanding of like, “Wow, this is our relationship,” all in how we’re speaking to each other. I know if I’m joking around with Laurie [a fellow teacher] it’s innocent, and it’s banter, because that’s what [Morisseau] wroote. And then with Nya and her relationship with her son, it’s like wow man, you can hear it. You can see it, his angst for wanting to please his mother. It’s Dominique, how she weaves those words so beautifully, it’s magic. It’s magic. 

 

INTERVIEWER: If you were recommending this play to a stranger, why would you say that they have to come see this production? What is special about this play to you? 

JCL: If I was recommending this play to a stranger, I would let them know that it’s bigger than just a play. This is almost like putting the system under a microscope and seeing where we went wrong, but then seeing how we can be responsible for helping to correct that. My thing is that, if you’re not doing anything, then you don’t have a right to speak on how bad things are. So come and see the play and see where some of the destruction of the incongruences are, and then see what you can do to affect that change. That’s why you gotta come and see it. You aren’t gonna walk out the same way you walked in.


PIPELINE runs from March 6th through March 29th. Get your tickets by clicking here or by calling our box office at 770-426-2800. Group and educational rates available via phone.

“HE JUST WANTS TO BE HEARD” 

An interview with Darian Rolle, an actor in PIPELINE 

 

DARIAN ROLLE  is a Bahamian-American television, theatre, and film actor. He was born in Raleigh, North Carolina, and attended the University of North Carolina at Pembroke where he received his BA in Theatre Arts. Shortly after graduation he moved to Atlanta to further his career. Rolle plays Omari in PIPELINE at Marietta’s New Theatre in the Square. We caught up with him to hear about his process. 


INTERVIEWER: PIPELINE features several seminal literary works by Black authors (Gwendolyn Brooks’ “We Real Cool,” Richard Wright’s “Native Son,” and Ralph Ellison’s “Invisible Man”). Do you have a core work of Black art, literary or otherwise, that consistently inspires you? 

 

DR: First thing that comes to mind would be Jean-Michel Basquiat; he’s a painter. He specializes in neo-expressionism, mainly speaks about classism, the power structure, and racism through his art, and he comes to it with, I would say, a very primitive approach, so I’m often inspired. I think about how much growth we need as a society and individually when I look at his art, so I would have to say him. 

 

INTERVIEWER: This play explores the power of two parallel pipelines- the school to prison pipeline and the pipeline of those who are decided to be “gifted and talented.” Throughout, we witness the power of educators, particularly those who empower their students to be who they really are, uninhibited by stereotypes or respectability politics. Is there a teacher or mentor who has empowered you in this way? How have they inspired your experience with PIPELINE? 

 

DR: I would say my college professors Jonathan Drahos and Holden Hansen, and then all of my peers at school. I’m inspired by all of them; they teach me everything. But one thing that comes to mind, [my professor] told me to always approach every project with a sense of urgency- everything high stakes always. That helps with this show because the important elements of it; it’s important to come with it like it’s life or death.

 

INTERVIEWER: PIPELINE is an emotionally complex play, exploring simultaneously dynamics

of race, class, and family. What drew you to this project? 

 

DR: All those things, man. I think as actors we look for important stories to tell, and this was one. That, and the fact that I need it. Theatre is just such a free process, you know what I mean? I can’t explain it. So those two together, it was just a golden opportunity for me. A story of this magnitude, to tell somebody something and make somebody leave the theatre feeling different than when they came in. 

 

INTERVIEWER: You all are early in the creation process. What has brought you the most joy

working with this ensemble so far? What are you excited about? 

 

DR: What’s brought me the most joy is that it’s always cool to be in a place where everybody is like-minded. We all want to tell this story so badly, and we just want it to be great, so when you’re around that energy it’s just- there’s nothing like it. 

 

INTERVIEWER: Dominque Morisseau displays an amazing use of language in this play, as each character speaks in their own unique musicality and cadence. It’s as if each person has their own poetry. How does the dialogue of this play affect your understanding of the story?

 

DR: With Omari, I get a sense from the dialogue that he’s a very passionate person but also very smart. Even in his youth he uses words that a normal 17-year-old probably wouldn’t use, you know what I mean? He’s very smooth, very charming, but also he wants to be heard, you know? That’s where most of his anger and passion comes from in this play. He’s a kid that’s been put in this situation and just wants to be heard more than anything else.

 

INTERVIEWER: If you were recommending this play to a stranger, why would you say that they have to come see this production? What is special about this play to you? 

DR: What’s special about PIPELINE is the dynamics, the different relationships you see. In this play, you got the son and the mother, you got the son and the father, wife and husband, even husband and potential love interest of the mother; there’s a bunch of different things together that we don’t see often. All those dynamics together, it makes for a very compelling story.


PIPELINE runs from March 6th through March 29th. Get your tickets by clicking here or by calling our box office at 770-426-4800. Group and educational rates available via phone.

“A PLAY ABOUT COMMUNITY” 

An interview with Mia Kristin Smith, the director of PIPELINE 

 

MIA KRISTIN SMITH gives her all to every artistic project she gets her hands on. An artistic director, director, dramaturg, actress, and playwright (amongst other things), Smith’s work has been named one of Atlanta’s Best Bets, and featured in Creative Loafing and Burnaway Magazine. Smith is a storyteller with a keen eye and clear voice, and she is the director of PIPELINE at Marietta’s New Theatre in the Square. We caught up with her to hear about her process. 


INTERVIEWER: PIPELINE features several seminal literary works by Black authors (Gwendolyn Brooks’ “We Real Cool,” Richard Wright’s “Native Son,” and Ralph Ellison’s “Invisible Man”). Do you have a core work of Black art, literary or otherwise, that consistently inspires you? 

 

MKS: Absolutely. I love Toni Morrison and her works. I love playwrights; I love the African American women playwrights- Pearl Cleage, but especially Suzan Lori-Parks, and Dominique Morisseau as well. 

 

INTERVIEWER: This play explores the power of two parallel pipelines- the school to prison pipeline and the pipeline of those who are decided to be “gifted and talented.” Throughout, we witness the power of educators, particularly those who empower their students to be who they really are, uninhibited by stereotypes or respectability politics. Is there a teacher or mentor who has empowered you in this way? How have they inspired your experience with PIPELINE? 

 

MKS: You know I was having a conversation with one of my cast members and my stage manager recently, and I was saying I feel that I missed out on a lot of that stuff. I went to a Catholic school, a lot of nuns, and it was predominantly white so I never felt like – and it’s not too say anything bad about the way they taught me – it was just I didn’t feel inspired inside, to be myself. I felt inspired to make sure that I became educated and that I was able to go on with my life and do something with myself, but never did I feel like I should be proud of who I am. It wasn’t until I decided to go back to school in my 30’s, my mid-30’s, that I started learning from African American women, and there were so many of them there, at the New School of General Studies. I started learning about African American female writers and the stories that we had gone through. For me to list one or two of [my teachers] during that period would be just- it’d be hard to do that! So I would say that it was when I went to New York, and I studied, and I decided to take African American Humanities and studies of women writers that made me feel inspired to be happy with who I am.  

INTERVIEWER: PIPELINE is an emotionally complex play, exploring simultaneously dynamics

of race, class, and family. What drew you to this project? 

 

MKS: The fact–as I have mentioned before–that I am a fan of Dominique Morisseau. I was drawn to this piece because my mother was a teacher all of our lives, and my sister is a teacher. I tried teaching; my brother is a teacher; we all followed in it because we were inspired by the work she was doing and how she would give of herself to her students. We used to laugh and say, “Mama you have the keys!” She’d be there at 6 AM, she’d come home at 6 PM. She taught special education so she was very into the lives of her kids and emotionally took it home with her. Hearing the story about Nya and knowing how we as kids sometimes were upset that my mom was giving so much of her time to her students–you know, you’re a child and you’re like “I want her with me,” and just listening to the stories she said about these kids, and these boys that were dealing with different stuff in their neighborhoods. I was inspired to see it from the other side and see how this woman, how Nya dealt with her personal stuff with her son and the stuff with her students and be able to bring those two worlds together. It’s actually made me appreciate her mom and her work a little more.

 

INTERVIEWER: You all are early in the creation process. What has brought you the most joy

working with this ensemble so far? What are you excited about? 

 

MKS: Oh the discoveries. We’ve had some ups and downs with everyone because everyone has an opinion of what the story’s about–because our lives are different! It could be the same story but it affects everyone differently, and we’re discovering where even though we are in a difference of opinion when we come together we come together still wanting to tell the same story. It has been great, finding things that I didn’t come into the room with, or they didn’t come into the room with, and we’re like, “Oh my God!” So it’s the discoveries and the “ah-ha” moments.

 

INTERVIEWER: Dominique Morisseau displays an amazing use of language in this play, as each character speaks in their own unique musicality and cadence. It’s as if each person has their own poetry. How does the dialogue of this play affect your understanding of the story?

 

MKS: It’s relatable! When I pick [the script] up it’s not words that I have to go to the dictionary to look them up; I don’t have to try and research how people talk in a certain area of town. It is me; it is black woman! It is my son–I have a 13-year-old, and Omari is him! I love that Dominique made it a choice to talk with the cadence of it, even the articulations that she writes in there, it’s so real, it’s our everyday talking. It’s just inspiring. 

 

INTERVIEWER: If you were recommending this play to a stranger, why would you say that they have to come see this production? What is special about this play to you? 

 

MKS: Because this play is about community. It’s being told as a Black story, but it is a story that we all are going through. I think that especially if you are an educator or you know an educator, and that’s everyone- you’ve had a teacher, you’ve had someone that has inspired you, or you’ve had a student sit next to you (it might have been friend), that was going through the same thing that this story is talking about. It involves everyone. I think that it’s an injustice if you don’t come to see this play. 


PIPELINE runs from March 6th through March 29th. Get your tickets by clicking here or by calling our box office at 770-426-4800. Group and educational rates available via phone.

WE STRIKE STRAIGHT

PIPELINE is a play for educators. Available to watch in your classroom!

What singular play can electrify students, educate on Black literature, navigate themes of American education, AND be delivered directly to your classroom? PIPELINE, at Marietta’s New Theatre in the Square!

PIPELINE follows the story of Nya, a public high school teacher in the inner-city, who is committed to her students, but is desperate to give her son opportunities they’ll never have. Enter Omari, her son, a black man in his late teens, who is tender and honest but wrestling with his identity. The two love each other fiercely, but clash as Omari faces the possibility of expulsion at the elite private school that Nya chose for him. 

PIPELINE is a play in which students can see themselves navigating the difficult dynamics of coming of age. While they are entranced by the characters and plot of the play, they will be introduced to quintessential works of Black literature throughout. From Gwendolyn Brooks’ “We Real Cool” read in full, to extended references of Ralph Ellison’s The Invisible Man, PIPELINE connects experiences and themes from a variety of literary works. 

Due to the strength of PIPELINE’s script and educational content, we at MNTITS are offering a new service to schools. While groups are still welcome to attend weekday matinees for reduced rates, they can also purchase a streaming pass. This pass will allow you to watch PIPELINE in the comfort of your own classroom, at whatever time is convenient for you. Both of these offerings are available by calling our box office at 770-426-4800. 

See our graphic below for further information about how PIPELINE can be applied to the Georgia Standards of Excellence. We can’t wait to see you at the show! 

 

PIPELINE contains strong language and consumption of alcohol and tobacco. We recommend it for audiences age 13 and older.


PIPELINE, a moving drama about a mother’s love, playing soon at Marietta’s New Theatre in the Square! 

Nya is a powerful public school teacher working hard to give her son the opportunities he deserves. She sends him to an upstate private school, only to face such a controversy that he may be expelled. What follows is a moving drama of a mother’s fight for her family. PIPELINE is an urgent story about love, family, race, and class that will have audiences on the edge of their seats.

Directed by award-winning writer and theatre artist, Mia Kristin Smith, this production of PIPELINE features outstanding Atlanta talent that has been featured on stage and screen. The riveting story is a great pick for your Women’s History Month, as it showcases the power of maternal strength. Dominique Morriseau’s PIPELINE was the winner of the 2016 Edgerton Foundation New Play Award and is sure to leave audiences riveted and wanting more.

PIPELINE is available for schools and educational groups. This play discusses major works of African American literature and pairs well with the Georgia Standards of Excellence for high school students. Call our box office to learn about group rates or to purchase a streaming pass to watch the production in the comfort of your own classroom. PIPELINE contains strong language and depicts alcohol and tobacco consumption. We recommend it for audiences over the age of 13.


PIPELINE plays from March 6th through March 29th at Marietta’s New Theatre in the Square, located at 11 Whitlock Ave NW, Marietta, GA 30064. Tickets are available by clicking here or by calling the box office at (770) 426-4800.